Who is this course for

Since there will never be another course at the Tea Sage Hut, we thought we would publish these as a time capsule, offering you two different versions. These discourses happened within the context of a retreat space, and should be listened to with that in mind. Participants would have sat down to hear them after a long day of meditation, tea ceremony and tea classes. For that reason, the discourses have little to do with tea and are not related to tea preparation instructions in any way, save that how we do anything is how we do everything. These are for those who took a ten-day course at the Tea Sage Hut or who want some short inspiration for after their evening meditation. These discourses could also be used to conduct a self-retreat, or a small retreat with friends. This course is audio only.

What you will learn

  • Meditation instructions to begin your meditation practice
  • Metta instructions
  • Chants from Tea Sage Hut ten-day course
  • Discourses on Zen
  • Life lessons for deep contemplations
  • Inspiration to continue your practice of self-cultivation

What you get

  • 2 x hour-long meditation instructions
  • 2 different versions of the discourses from the ten-day courses at the Tea Sage Hut
  • Final Metta from the course
  • Bonus recording of some of the chants from a ten-day course
  • A small course book with the chants, explanations of Tea Sage Hut precepts and more

Meet your teacher

For more than twenty-five years Wu De has dedicated himself to the study and teaching of Cha Dao and Zen in all their forms, writing books, articles and traveling the world teaching. Aaron Fisher was born in a very small town in Ohio and grew up practicing martial arts, which first introduced him to Eastern practices. In college, he studied anthropology and Asian philosophy. At that time, he also began a meditation practice, which ultimately led him to India upon graduation. After a few years in India, he traveled Asia, eventually settling in Japan and then Taiwan, where he has continued his studies of meditation and tea ceremony to this day. “Wu De” is his dharma name, given when he committed more deeply to Zen practice.

Together with this community and the hard work of hundreds of volunteers, Wu De helped found the Tea Sage Hut center and Global Tea Hut magazine and tea club. However, Chajin (tea people) seek no credit or acclaim. Wu De always says that the only masters in Zen and Tea are those who have passed away; the rest of us are students and remain so for as long as we live. “You want to call me ‘master’,” he often says, “wait until I’m dead. Until then, I am a student of the Leaf!” High seats have no place in Zen or in Tea. In Zen and Tea, we all sit on the same floor and practice, live and work together.